SPACES

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New art. Not old, used art.

Munnneeeee!

Save? Who, me?

Oink oink.

It’s me again, SPACES’ money-grubbing development manager. It seems like  everyone I talk to these days has cash on the brain. Some are resolving to save more in 2010, and others are stressed about paying off holiday credit card bills. I flip on the radio after a long day of begging for funds, and all of the stories obsess over the economy in general.

The same holds true here in the gallery. We’re topical. Get a load of this:

One of our current exhibitions, Art Work: A National Conversation About Art, Labor, and Economics, reflects on artists who work amidst depressed economies and how that impacts artistic process, compensation and artistic property. Fortunately for SPACES, Art Work was funded by Lauren Rich Fine & Gary Giller and the John P. Murphy Foundation.

Our next exhibition, ” … in a most dangerous manner”, takes its title from a passage in Karl Marx’s Das Kapital:

Talk about centralisation! The credit system, which has its focus in the so-called national banks and the big money-lenders and usurers surrounding them, constitutes enormous centralisation, and gives to this class of parasites the fabulous power, not only to periodically despoil industrial capitalists, but also to interfere in actual production in a most dangerous manner — and this gang knows nothing about production and has nothing to do with it. [emphasis mine]

Need I mention that this exhibition includes work that —  in one way or another — touches on capitalism and/or economic collapse?

SPACES brings Northeast Ohio artists a chance to build on their creative capital through SPACELab, a forum for experimentation that comes with a small $tipend (emphasis on small). We’re accepting applications now through March 31!

And while all of the lovely programming folks at SPACES make their hard-earned dollars organizing art, I get mine filling out hundreds and hundreds of questions for the Ohio Cultural Data Project. It’s due January 15, and funders claim that it will streamline the funding process for participants, as well as provide valuable data for demonstrating the economic impact of the arts in Ohio.

And finalllly … I can’t forget to mention the talented artists in Cuyahoga County who are receiving Creative Workforce Fellowships. These awards were announced last month by the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture here in Cleveland. Talk about a cash infusion! Congratulations!

Wishing all of you a prosperous 2010!

~ posted by Sarah McGreer Hoyt, Development Manager

Filed under: call to artists, Cleveland, Guest Bloggers, SPACES Funders & Donors, , , , , , , , , , ,

Remember Issue 18? It’s got a new leader …

Well, we’ve made it past Issues 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, etc. for 2009!

Maybe you’re happy with the outcome of the vote on these issues, or maybe you’ve already forgotten what they were. In any case, all of those issues on the ballot got me to thinking about good ol’ Issue 18.  Remember that one? A little refresher: Cigarettes sold in Cuyahoga County + a 1.5-cent-per-cigarette tax applied through 2017 = $$$ for the arts.

As we know, Issue 18 passed in 2006. And according to the 2008 Annual Report issued by Cuyahoga Arts and Culture (CAC), in just three years, the tax has generated nearly 50 million dollars and enabled $33,560,000 in art-supporting grants.

SPACES benefits from one of those grants. It’s a huge source of income for us, and we’re grateful to the citizens of Cuyahoga County for their support through Cuyahoga Arts and Culture.

On a related note, CAC appointed Karen Gahl-Mills as their new executive director last week. Gahl-Mills has served as the president and executive director of the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra since 2006. Read the press release here.

I’m sure Meg, Achala, Donnie, and all of our friends at CAC are very excited to welcome Karen in 2010. Until then, they’re keeping busy with a whole slew of workshops to inform organizations about how to apply for CAC funds. Check out the calendar of events on their homepage.

And next time you’re out and about at your favorite Cuyahoga County arts organization — favorite besides SPACES, that is — look around for the Cuyahoga Arts and Culture name on the wall or in the program. Chances are, they’re a beneficiary of Issue 18, too.

— posted by Sarah McGreer Hoyt, Development Manager

Filed under: Arts Advocacy, Cleveland, SPACES Funders & Donors, , ,

Um, excuse me, but is your wordle showing?

cloud-types

Sometimes I am surprised about what Cleveland art lovers don’t know about SPACES.

For example, I’ve had conversations with people who attend every SPACES opening, but were not aware of our amazing artist-in-residence program, the SPACES World Artists Program (SWAP), which (to date) has brought 27 artists from around the world to live and make art in our city.

“Oh, that’s so cool! I didn’t know about it,” I’ve heard more than one exhibition attendee say, once they have the full scoop on SWAP.

It makes me wonder sometimes exactly what we’re conveying in our messages … emails … conversations … about SPACES. Sometimes as a fundraiser, it’s really, really hard to know how to tell my organization’s story effectively. What words resonate? How much text is too much? Are we staying on-message?

Today, though, I learned about Wordle, and never again will I have to wonder what we’re conveying on our homepage. According to the website, Wordle is “a toy for generating ‘word clouds’ from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text.”

Here’s our Wordle. It might not tell you everything about SPACES … but it’s kind of pretty.

— Posted by Sarah “Give us Money” Hoyt

Filed under: SPACES, SPACES Funders & Donors, SPACES staff, SWAP Stories, , , ,

What the NEA means to us …

I’d like to start by saying, simply, I <3 the National Endowment for the Arts. I’ve worked at three different arts organizations in the last 10 years (The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Mid-America Arts Alliance, and now SPACES) and all are regular recipients of NEA funding. For example, the SPACES World Artist Program (SWAP) has received NEA funding for the last six years.

Reason enough to love the NEA, right? They support fabulous art institutions that bring quality art to communities of all sizes across the United States.

But, as with all relationships, it’s a little more complicated than that.

Rewind almost three years …

I was working from my home office in Cleveland for Mid-America Arts Alliance, which is located in Kansas City, Missouri. As a fairly recent transplant to Ohio, I wanted to get to know the area, so I volunteered at the Cleveland Artists Foundation. The nice gallery manager there, Nicole Edwards, told me that there was a development manager position open at SPACES. Shortly after that, she started working for SPACES in a communications role, and I was hired for the development position.

We share an office, the same middle name (Louise) and the same taste in music. She’s a really, really wonderful person to work with.

But we almost didn’t live happily ever after …

Things are tight, folks. We are a nonprofit, and I’d be kidding you, me, and a whole bunch of other people if I said that we aren’t thinking a lot about where the next dollar is coming from. Fortunately, the National Endowment for the Arts used funds allocated through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for job preservation. More precisely: to support the preservation of jobs that are threatened by declines in philanthropic and other support during the current economic downturn.

We applied and received funds to preserve the communications manager position. That means Nicole  — without whom I wouldn’t have this job — can count on keeping her job.nicole

I love the NEA …

~ Posted by Sarah Hoyt, Sr. Marketing & Development Manager

Filed under: SPACES Funders & Donors, SPACES staff, , , ,

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